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First cat joins San Francisco Airport’s team of therapy animals

San Francisco Airport adds first cat to roster of therapy animals

San Francisco Airport adds first cat to roster of therapy animals

Duke Ellington Morris: From Stray Cat to Airport Therapy Animal

Duke Ellington Morris, a once-stray cat rescued and adopted by a loving family, is now helping humans at California’s San Francisco International Airport. At 14 years old, Duke has become the first feline to join SFO’s team of therapy animals, known as the “Wag Brigade,” at the end of May.

Duke’s journey started in 2010 when he was found starving among other feral cats in San Francisco. The San Francisco Animal Care and Control rescued him, and a girl spotted the tuxedo cat, and her family quickly took him home. His calm and warm demeanor impressed his humans, and they certified him as a therapy animal through the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ animal assisted therapy program.

Duke has been working as an animal therapist in hospitals all over the city for the past decade, comforting patients in trying times. And now, he’ll also be helping airport visitors relieve travel-related stress by joining the motley crew of SFO’s therapy animals, which include several dogs, a rabbit named Alex the Great, and a pig named LiLou – each certified and tested therapy animals.

The non-human therapists walk around the airport’s terminals wearing “Pet Me” vests, comforting anxious travelers. The program launched in 2013 and returned in 2021 after a 20-month hiatus due to the COVID pandemic.

FAQs:

Q: How did Duke Ellington Morris become a therapy animal?
A: Duke’s calm and warm demeanor impressed his humans, and they certified him as a therapy animal through the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ animal assisted therapy program.

Q: Where has Duke been working as an animal therapist?
A: Duke has been working in hospitals all over the city of San Francisco for the past decade, comforting patients in trying times.

Q: What is the Wag Brigade?
A: The Wag Brigade is SFO’s team of therapy animals, which include several dogs, a rabbit named Alex the Great, and a pig named LiLou – each certified and tested therapy animals.

Q: Where do the non-human therapists walk, and what do they do?
A: The non-human therapists walk around the airport’s terminals wearing “Pet Me” vests, comforting anxious travelers.

Q: When did the therapy animal program launch?
A: The therapy animal program launched in 2013 and returned in 2021 after a 20-month hiatus due to the COVID pandemic.

San Francisco Airport adds first cat to roster of therapy animals
San Francisco Airport adds first cat to roster of therapy animals

First feline added to San Francisco Airport’s fleet of therapy animals

A once-stray cat, that was rescued from the streets of San Francisco, has now become a therapy animal that is helping humans. The San Francisco International Airport’s (SFO) team of therapy animals, known as the “Wag Brigade”, has welcomed Duke Ellington Morris, a 14-year-old black-and-white cat, as the first feline to join its ranks.

Duke was found starving among other feral cats and rescued by a shelter in 2010. A 5-year-old girl saw the tuxedo cat at the San Francisco Animal Care and Control, and her family quickly adopted him. “I hear my daughter shrieking with joy, ‘I love the black and white kitty.’ And I’m like, ‘What are you talking about?’” Duke’s owner, Jen Morris, told SF Gate. “We met Duke, and he was focused on my daughter. And I figured, well, if a cat wants a 5-year-old for his next guardian, he couldn’t be that bad.”


San Francisco Airport adds first cat to roster of therapy animals
Duke Ellington Morris joined the California airport’s Wag Brigade as the first feline to join the San Francisco International Airport’s team of therapy animals.
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Jen Morris quickly discovered Duke’s calm and warm demeanor and got him certified as a therapy animal through the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ animal-assisted therapy program. For the last decade, Duke has been visiting patients in hospitals all over San Francisco to provide comfort in times of need. He has now joined SFO’s team of therapy animals, alongside several dogs, a rabbit named Alex the Great, and a pig named LiLou, who have each been certified and tested as therapy animals, and wears a “Pet Me” vest to comfort anxious travelers at the airport’s terminals. The program, which first launched in 2013, returned in 2021 after a 20-month

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